The Line of Best Fit's Scores

  • Music
For 2,516 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 28% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Start Together [Box Set]
Lowest review score: 30 Sheezus
Score distribution:
2516 music reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Like many of Dawson’s projects, its effect is gradual but profound: it takes a little time to truly settle into Mogic, but it’s nigh-impossible to leave once you become accustomed to its mores.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A still-formidable effort, but perhaps not the homecoming .Paak would have produced if he'd decided to go his own way.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This retrospective gives the perfect platform for some of Brainfeeder’s forgotten gems to be rediscovered, too. The vivid textures of Teebs, Lapalux’s dystopian soul and Taylor McFerrin’s retro glow are a beautiful reminder of the unsung heroes that have helped keep the label’s sound moving forward. Not ones to dwell on the past, the second half looks to the future, giving fans a brief glimpse of things to come.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The ten songs on this thing really are special, and worthy of the epic introduction tacked on to every article about it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Everything is presented with a glossy sheen which may prove too much for some, especially fans of arguably their best album, 1998’s underrated and unloved Adore, and as with every other Pumpkins album, it’s hard to see where Corgan and Chamberlin end, and the other players begin. Yet if you weren’t expecting much from this latest attempt at keeping the band alive, you'll be impressed at how revitalised they sound.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It achieves the toughest task for a soundtrack--to maintain interest independent of the images it was built to accompany and accentuate--with impressive ease.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Cocoon Crush is a portrait of an artist in transition. It’s rough around the edges, occasionally stunning, and always surprising.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    BTR best functions as a way to experience every mode that Grace has to offer as both songwriter and vocalist. It’s also the closest that Grace has come to letting others in and having a direct dialogue with the outside world.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Elastic Days will for many be a welcome catch up with Mascis, and for those not yet acquainted, it is the perfect place to say hi.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The results are expectedly bonkers, with some of Ling’s tales ushered into songs and others scored by improvisations, the collection bound by a deeply English eccentricity and a shared love of pop music's spikier edges.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Clearer in vision and production than debut Shapeshifter, Crush Crusher is especially potent in the trios that start and end the album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Thresholder is a triumph of meticulously detailed composition and, at the same time, a masterpiece that seems to evolve, albeit in an unnaturally sepulchral soundworld of fragmentation, from the simplest of sources into a life-affirming wholeness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It’s an album that sets out to excite and take risks and be messy. Alternately visceral and cerebral, and building with a whole new set of tools, UMO’s second release this year feels like a band bursting from their bubble; saying plenty about both Nielson’s fevered creativity, and the future of his cherished project.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Sincere, moving and musically ambitious.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There is palpable pleasure--for both McCallum and her listeners--as she shrugs off her old identity and, in losing her voice, goes in search of herself.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Be warned: a full appreciation of this album requires numerous listens - it offers little at first glance, but the moment you surrender yourself to this fate, all becomes clear.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What Farao does so well on Pure-O is to create something nuanced and interesting. With an extra bit of reverb here, a pitch shift there, she ensures that the stands out from other synthpop, which can feel clinical: too clean and polished.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    On first listen, the absence of a nihilistic mantra to grasp onto may disappoint fans, but the deceptively simple pleasures of Honey open up with each listen. Robyn is trusting her instincts; finding care and wonder in the spaces she once went for punishment.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s a work that’s in a constant state of flux, the flow giving and yielding just like our emotions. A sense of healing and growth radiates from it, with the sparkling pop feel of “Yellow of the Sun” bringing the album round to a complete and circular ending.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Where Care lived up to its title with its balm-like electronics, The Anteroom is often a challenging listen. Its constantly adapting sonic landscapes are fitting for an urgent political and ecological moment: its song-like identifying features perpetually breaking down like a dying star, or planet, or human.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Last Building Burning is, truly, as inspiring, energizing and life-affirming as punk is likely to get in 2018.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Over the course of the record, MØ finds her own identity again. And although Forever Neverland features Diplo, Charli XCX and Empress Of (two of which for whom she’s returning the favour), they never overshadow her; a refreshing angle considering she’s been the featured one for the past few years.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a record with a few winners, a few losers and some fillers. However, it is by no means a poor record. There’s plenty here that most modern electro artists would die to produce, but it’s a shame that there’s just so much here that falls far short of the work Dear has done in the past.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    It’s precise where MASSEDUCTION was deliciously sloppy. But in real terms, they’re both as near to perfect as a pop record is going to get these days--incredibly perceptive, personal and inviting with clever lyrics sitting on beautifully inventive melodies. Both albums are great. Both albums deserve all the awards.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Vile had the opportunity, with the success of his previous solo album, to make something completely polished and aim for the stars to just see where he landed. Rather than dialling back the finesse, he could have aimed for his Rumours, his Full Moon Fever. Instead, his eyes seemly firmly fixed on the road, then at the beach and then at the gutter. And it’s a thrill to join him everywhere he goes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 35 Critic Score
    The outright corniness of some of the tracks--the steel drums of “Night Chef”, the softened yacht-rock of “Conceptual Mediterranean (Part 1)”--test the listener’s patience. Ultimately the purposeful superficiality of Out of Touch renders it inessential.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Where the original lacked depth, these versions source it through the lens of a quasi 21-track double album with revived bass and energy that is the stuff of their live shows.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Brandon Coleman's debut album is a funk-fuelled cacophony that some will adore, but its over-commitment to a narrow sound means that, unless you fall in love, you may find limited replay-ability in this album.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It’s a deeply engaging, consistently great release from a uniquely interesting artist. It’s just a damn shame that he’ll never get the chance to do it again.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I Loved You At Your Darkest dips in and out of musical splendour, changing course and reference, and while not necessarily black metal in a full labeling sense, nor rock-heavy alone, it’s a rather accessible hybrid.

Warning: file_put_contents(): Only 0 of 118350 bytes written, possibly out of free disk space in /home/admin/web/telezritel.net/public_html/vendor/doctrine/cache/lib/Doctrine/Common/Cache/FileCache.php on line 254