DIY Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 1,963 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Not to Disappear
Lowest review score: 20 The Atlas Underground
Score distribution:
1963 music reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There’s not much in the way of stylistic cohesion, either, and you wonder whether that’s simply because the creativity was flowing out of the almost-fully-reformed lineup or simply because Billy felt confident in following his every whim.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    At this point Mumford & Sons know exactly what they have to do to keep the Spotify streams rolling over, and Delta feels like an exercise in box-ticking, no more, no less.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Across the record, all prop each other up to create something that’s more than the sum of their parts. In this case, three in a B.E.D fits just fine.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s powerfully honest and refreshingly unfiltered, beautifully crafted and distinctive. Most importantly of all it carries the legacy of Tom Searle, and of the remaining Architects members, forward.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s when they come together on closer ‘Ketchum, ID’, an ode to the state of Idaho and the detachment of constant touring, that boygenius really comes into its own and sees the project become more than the sum of its parts.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Take a step back from the ins and outs of the record and Simulation Theory stands as a ridiculous, bombastic stab of maximalism from one of the world’s biggest stadium rock bands.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Paying homage to songwriting ancestors, there’s an unmistakable Americana twist across much of the record that on occasion even turns to Nashville-tinged country. Yet Bought To Rot is pulled together by consistently bestowing valuable life lessons.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The last couple of Dinosaur Jr. records in particular have been praised from all angles for their consistency, but J Mascis is continuing to fire out hidden gems under his own name, too.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Paul’s commitment to trying new things is to be lauded, but it does mean Diagrams lacks cohesion; it feels less an album and more a collection of ideas, some thrilling, others less so.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At times, No Tourists feels like a companion to their debut. That was the night out and this is the morning after’s hangover. While this isn’t vintage Prodigy, it gets pretty damn close and gives hope there is still life in the old dog yet.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Individually the likes of ‘Time Will Be The Only Saviour’, with its creeping strings and weighty sorrow, or the Rizzo-quoting ‘There Are Worse Things I Could Do’, are tender, sad things, but as a whole piece, Yawn can wind up a claustrophobic listen.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This second LP Crush Crusher sees her grab all the promise of her 2016 debut and years at the heart of her hometown’s DIY scene and turn it into something great.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    FM!
    While ‘Big Fish Theory’ saw the rapper centre stage, relentless and omnipresent, on ‘FM!’ he lets us tune in to a calmer world, one which he dips in and out of when he pleases, filling in the blanks and staying in the fast lane.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The one constant success of her sound is her ability to jump from one song to the next in a way that rarely seems jarring; it’ll serve her well to keep the multi-faceted nature of her sound from here on out.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Fudge Sandwich, Ty breathes new life into an already solid collection of rock songs, and he is an ever-mutating musician on this album as he is in real life.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    ‘Hanoi 4’ is a driving, groove-led funk workout, while ‘Hanoi 5’ pits all kind of warped gurgles against a nocturnal jazz saxophone. They’re stranger, more direct beasts without the foil of Ruban’s soft vocal and often all the more ominous for it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From micro passages like the 30-second ‘An Audition’ to the 14-minute swell of ambient vocal track ‘A Chorus Of One’, he successfully contrasts optimism and tenderness with hopelessness and terror, with an impressive breadth of emotion being evoked across each track.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Despite the album’s beginning in confusion, Saturn sounds genuinely uplifting throughout with her impressive vocal range being the focal point.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Unusual yet distinctive, Aviary may alienate some but you can’t fault the depth of Julia’s grand vision for her work.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [Missing U's] Thudding kick drum pounds away underneath defiant lyrics of heartache, and it’s as affecting as she’s ever been. It’s the rest of the record, though, that really excels, pointing the way forward for an artist changing her tune.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yes, there’s nothing of the size or scale of ‘Lean On’, but in unapologetically treading her own path, MØ’s beginning to carve a new identity all of her own.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Anteroom is surely How To Dress Well’s most exciting work to date; it might, in time, unfurl into his most poignant and vital, too.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Last Building Burning is Cloud Nothings embracing a harsher component to their sound--almost recalling the likes of recent Oh Sees releases--which has grown into something unsettled, bold and reckless.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Us
    She is as captivating as ever, but the rougher edges have been removed slightly giving us a more polished, and immediate, album.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not consolidating or scaling back their ambition in the slightest, mewithoutYou continue to be one of indie-rock’s most consistently fascinating voices, and on ‘[Untitled]’ they’re as weird and wonderful as ever.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The opening three numbers shine, showing a refreshing sound bursting at the seams with positivity, but the lack of variety means that, by the end, you may feel slightly bludgeoned by it all.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Iit feels like a natural extension from what’s come before rather than a bold move forward, but you can tell Santigold had fun making it all the same.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Accordingly, he’s lent the whole affair an electronic flavour that doesn’t really work. In some cases, that’s because it’s crashingly outdated.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Love Is Magic feels like a victory lap. Frequently boundary-pushing, side-splittingly funny and anything but safe, John Grant’s fourth LP is a rip-roaring thrill ride that’s immensely danceable to boot. Magic really does work in mysterious ways.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Kurt takes a leaf out of Courtney’s book and wears his heart on his sleeve, searching for introspection and delving into his deepest and most personal lyrics to date--about love, loss and everything in between.

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