Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,530 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Chinatown
Lowest review score: 0 Uncommon Valor
Score distribution:
6530 movie reviews
  1. After a point, we’re left wondering whether we’re watching a character study or caricature. Either way, the portrait gradually morphs from intriguing to tedious.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Any movie on this subject that’s not uncomfortable isn’t really doing its job, and Ben Is Back puts an audience through a wringer of emotional and physical suspense. If you’ve dealt with addiction, personally or in your extended family, the movie should probably come with a trigger warning.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One of the wittiest and most creatively exuberant movies of the year, and maybe one of the best.
  2. Dava Whisenant’s documentary, Bathtubs Over Broadway, offers a glimpse into a world few are aware of: industrial musicals — Broadway-style productions similar to Broadway shows except that they promote products like bathtub fixtures, surgical supplies, and John Deere tractors. They were performed exclusively for company members, sometimes recorded or filmed, then forgotten.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is less a movie than a collection of scenes lined up in a row, and the tone wobbles between pomp and circumstantial melodrama.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A brisk and reasonably thorough dog trot through a life that was simultaneously invisible and all powerful, and it’s goosed along with slick production techniques that more than once get in the way.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Like all the best films, Roma is achingly specific while constantly opening up to the universal.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s in theory the worst family movie of 2018 — and in practice one of the year’s best films.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie itself is great fun before it curdles intentionally into nastiness and drift.
  3. Tom Volf’s distinctive and affecting documentary makes plain how much the persona also owed to appearance and intelligence and life history.
  4. For much of its first half, Chef Flynn feels like an after-school special with a difference — a big, big difference.
  5. At its best moments, Creed II manages a feat nearly as striking as anything that Michael B. Jordan’s Rocky Balboa protégé pulls off in the boxing ring: It doesn’t play all that much like a sequel.
  6. The imaginative, touching, and dizzyingly animated Ralph Breaks the Internet is a sequel with a rich, broad vision that addresses all of these issues faster than you can say Fix-It Felix.
  7. Some of the film is slow. Some of it is silly.
  8. Schnabel tries to re-create van Gogh’s inner workings during the intense last two years of his life — his point of view and his way of looking at the world that resulted in the masterpieces that have since become invaluable investment commodities.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    By far the best part of Say Her Name: The Life and Death of Sandra Bland is that we get to see her face and hear her words.
  9. All movies are phony. What, you think beautiful people doing ugly things on a screen is real? Some movies are phonier than others. Widows is one of those. The always thin line between a twisty plot and a silly one gets crossed about an hour in.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie’s dramatically uneven, as anthology movies tend to be, but is it worth watching on the big screen? If the idea of Monument Valley peopled with classic Coen misfits hits your sweet spot, by all means go.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s the kind of movie that hammers on your heart even as it’s tripping over its feet, hobbled by unexamined notions of race, ethnicity, and class. Don’t look too closely, and you’ll have a very good time.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Burning, from South Korea’s Lee Chang-dong, is a beautifully cryptic slow burner that lingers long in the senses. It’s the kind of film where you obsess over what it means, the better to avoid thinking about how it makes you feel.
  10. So it’s a sort of grace note that Julien Faurat’s unusual and absorbing documentary, John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection, includes a snippet from the soundtrack of “Raging Bull,” probably the greatest and certainly the fiercest and most aestheticized of boxing movies.
  11. The particulars are often fascinating, but all the solemnity does work against a more rousing finish. The Netflix-distributed feature might equal “Braveheart” (1995) in its gritty authenticity, but that standard-setter’s memorably transportive quality was ultimately a far battle cry from this.
  12. The result is a reworking that feels both unnecessary and uninspired, even if it’s too genial and visually captivating to be flat-out off-putting.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A reporter is never the story — the story is the story. But if looking at the reporter helps you see the story, and the human beings the story is about, then the effort may be worth it. A Private War is worth it.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    And that’s what The Girl in the Spider’s Web is: soulless, bloodless product. Subtitled “A Dragon Tattoo Story,” it exists almost solely to drive a stake in the ground for the further franchising of author Stieg Larsson’s “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.”
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Boy Erased is strongest when it simply focuses on Jared as he copes with the trauma of coming out in a repressed society. This includes, in the film’s most shocking scene, a sequence of collegiate gay rape that leaves the boy with PTSD, which goes unnoticed and untreated by parents, authorities, and, to some extent, the film itself.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The stone-faced silent comedian’s influence on every possible aspect of physical comedy is wide and deep, attested to in this movie by entertainers old (Bill Irwin, Paul Dooley, Richard Lewis), ancient (Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner), youngish (Bill Hader, Quentin Tarantino), and random (Cybill Shepherd, Werner Herzog).
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    All in all, the movie’s a muddled and overlong experience, one that every so often drifts into dull, unintentional camp.
  13. What starts as a modest, agreeable riff on E.T.A. Hoffmann’s original tale — and, more relevantly, Tchaikovsky’s ballet — eventually veers into stultifying action, rote twists, and other badly forced contemporary tweaks.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    When art-minded film directors stoop to genre-minded filmmaking, it’s generally a good idea to duck. Despite sequences that may lodge in your memory forever, Luca Guadagnino’s Suspiria is no exception to this rule.

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