Dorothy Rabinowitz

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For 268 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dorothy Rabinowitz's Scores

Average review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Howards End
Lowest review score: 10 Prime Suspect: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 15 out of 268
268 tv reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Like the prisoners in their new freedom, these final episodes tend to wander. Still there’s a lot to be said for the series as a whole. In particular, the parts set in the institution, the focus on daily existence in the place, the clamor, the tensions, the character of the guards, the favors available for a little bribery, all of it a sterling evocation of prison life.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    This masterwork from HBO isn’t the sort whose powers depend on the suspense of plot turns. Every chapter is a profoundly moving world unto itself--a stunning achievement whose every moment lives in all the ways that matter in drama.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Viscerally penetrating thriller, outstanding in its subtlety, its anxiety-making atmospherics, and not least its heart--the contribution of a sterling cast headed by Julia Roberts in the role of therapist Heidi Bergman--inhabits a world beyond political themes. ... Mr. Whigham’s performance as Carrasco is plain delectable. So is virtually all else about this series whose exceptional powers, including the power to terrify, derive from conversation not action.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Ms. Collette does actually bring a spark to this enterprise, but not enough for a fire that would offset the tedium that comes with this work that is, with its six episodes, hellishly long, as are most of the conversations about sex.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It isn’t often that the components of a thriller can be said to blend perfectly with fiery social commentary, but it is the case with this marvelous production, which is downright terrifying in its aura of criminal menace and positively seething on the status of women--two very different dramatic forces, but they complement one another somehow.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The opening chapter’s gripping first scene finds the local FBI unit confronting a terror bombing. ... There’s also a smoothly supercilious, white supremacist (a striking performance by Dallas Roberts) and references to an organization with a title evocative of a current battle cry: Make America Great Again.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Relentlessly dark, occasionally exhausting and altogether gripping adaptation of Christie’s 1958 novel.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It comes with immense relief, therefore, to discover after most of an hour the beginnings of a true biographical portrait, a kind that continues to grow in strength to the end. It’s a success largely abetted by an assortment of commentators, longtime friends of Williams--among them comedians like Billy Crystal, Eric Idle and Steve Martin--who provide telling observations.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    This rollicking, sublimely written work of countless tones leaves no doubt that Thorpe was guilty of plotting obsessively to kill his once-adored younger lover, Norman Scott. ... Among its tones, the show manages a tender note or two for the character of Thorpe, which leads, in the end, to a convincingly complex portrait.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The film moves on two generations to another era, our own--and regrettably, for the most part, except for the luminous presence of Vanessa Redgrave, extraordinary as Flora, now grown old. ... [Her grandson's] a regular user of dating apps, but he’s just not a happy guy--which is, of course, the point of this final section, awash in sermonizing on the necessity of finding true love.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Its writing is the making of Succession, a 10-part romp not without its flaws--the soap-opera element is strong--but one without a dull moment.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    No one expects in a 21st-century film version, an hour and a half in length, anything approaching the subtlety and character that went into Bradbury’s novel. Still one might have asked--of a film titled “Fahrenheit 451”--for more than a one-note rant.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    For all its wandering through hopeless plotlines like Rose’s endless adventures planning her wedding, an effort at inspired abandon that grows more ghastly by the minute--and there are a lot of those--The Split in time finds its footing as powerful drama.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Whether thanks to the absence of those phones or not, there’s no missing the ebullience that courses through this splendidly realized drama of ambition, of workplace ties that bind--that brings it roaring spectacularly to life.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    An extravaganza of exhausting time shifts and mind-numbing dialogue that can use all the sympathy it gets. When the drama comes vividly alive, as it does often enough, the subject is seldom art. It’s almost always Picasso (a seductive if also largely unknowable character in Antonio Banderas’s subtle portrayal) and the women who loved him: women he loved and needed in turn and in time betrayed and abandoned.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    To watch the film’s Margaret (a sublime Hayley Atwell), is to see in full detail, the character Forster envisioned. ... In four episodes of sterling drama, Howards End has been brought fully to life on the television screen. That is no small achievement.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Al Pacino’s Paterno is so convincing, and eerily lifelike it becomes necessary from time to time, to remember that this isn’t the actual coach. ... The film may offer no verdict about the coach but there’s plenty of another kind of judgment here, captured vividly in the recurrent images of football violence. More eloquent still are the pictures of the raging mobs rioting over the threats to Paterno’s status.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    In the final season of The Americans the Jenningses--the KGB spy couple dedicated to unremitting war against the U.S.--are at war with one another, and a bitter, masterfully dramatized war it is. ... It comes as no surprise that one of the greatest drama series in television history should come to its end as powerful as ever.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The writing is sharp, the performances skilled. Ms. Barr and Mr. Goodman are their splendidly seasoned comic selves, and that’s more than enough reason to welcome the return of Roseanne.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    That Collateral--a four-part Netflix drama involving the struggles of migrants seeking asylum, the evils of human trafficking, perfidious intelligence agencies, women’s sexual victimization, drug-dealers and more--succeeds in achieving a certain suspense is no small miracle, given the confusion resulting from its hugely overcrowded script. Overcrowded by causes, that is, as well as characters.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It’s a testament to this series (created by Hossein Amini and James Watkins, and inspired by Misha Glenny’s book of the same name) that its seductions succeed as well as they do in overcoming its flaws. Among which we can count a pervasive tendency to moralizing babble bearing small resemblance to human discourse.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A wholly captivating tour exhaustive in its detail, which may or may not leave us with a deeper understanding of who we are, or of other cultures, though it’s likely to induce intense cravings to eat.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The narrative focus on Cunanan--he’s the story--is what holds this 10-part saga together, and it does so compellingly throughout.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    A series about 911 responders comes with built-in advantages in the drama department. Even so, there’s no missing the exceptional depth of detail, the emotional range and enterprise that undergird standard events—trying, for instance, to breathe life back into a swimmer knocked unconscious—and make them affecting.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    As any rational person would expect, the subject of HBO’s The Newspaperman: The Life and Times of Ben Bradlee--the executive editor who presided over the Washington Post’s coverage of the Watergate scandal that drove Richard Nixon from office--quickly emerges as a heroic figure. What’s not so expected, what comes as something bordering on shock, of a gratifying kind, is how much else the film takes on in this buoyant and mercilessly frank look at Bradlee’s life and career.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It’s fairly soon clear that this is script-writing captivated by its own ambiguity—a condition in no danger of being infectious to huge numbers of the film’s viewers.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It proceeds to full thriller mode, and an engaging kind it is in its over-familiar way, no small thanks to saving infusions of soap opera.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    There were reasons, other than the character of the Menendez brothers themselves, for the enduring notoriety of this case, and we’re introduced to one of the major ones early in the series (just two episodes of which NBC released for review). She’s Leslie Abramson (Edie Falco), attorney for Erik Menendez.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    It’s the kind of storytelling--ebullient, moving, brutal and informed with human mystery--whose every chapter only whets the appetite for more. ... A smashing work all around.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 90 Dorothy Rabinowitz
    The Last Tycoon--from Billy Ray and Christopher Keyser, executive producers and writers--has, in addition to its looks, superb writing, wit and huge ambition, its grasp of the passionate political heart of the era. There are no dead spots.

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