Brian Tallerico

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For 368 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Brian Tallerico's Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Master of None: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 LA to Vegas: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 51 out of 368
368 tv reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    Park and this series really blur the lines between actress, spy, and terrorist, noting how much all three rely on scripted narratives to accomplish their goals. It’s another high-profile mini-series that rewards the patient, and further proof of its director’s international importance.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    Escape at Dannemora, while well worth seeing for the performances, requires patience that it doesn’t quite repay. It’s a testament to the idea that just because a story can be longer now due to the change in viewing habits doesn’t mean it should.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    With great ideas, an interesting mystery, and a phenomenal ensemble, the only thing holding Homecoming back from the top tier of current television is a common issue with streaming service shows--pacing. Even at ten half-hour episodes, Homecoming drags its feet a few too many times, sinking back into valleys after notable peaks in episodes four and eight. It could have been a masterpiece at five or six episodes.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Brian Tallerico
    It’s a stunningly boring character drama, intertwining characters in New York City, ostensibly with a fairy tale motif doing some of the storytelling. ... The pacing, the dialogue, the (complete lack of) visual language, the world building--it’s impossible to point to a single element that works.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    It’s not flawless. Some of the performances, even in lead roles, are just a bit off (definitely not in supporting, in which you’ll find the legendary Barbara Crampton and always-solid Steven Weber), and I couldn’t shake the feeling that there’s a four-episode version of this story that’s stronger than the six. ... Like the stories on which it’s based, it seeks to unsettle you more than shock or disturb. And “The Dream Door” definitely does exactly that.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    The Haunting of Hill House contains some of the most unforgettable horror imagery in film or television in years. The best horror film of the year also happens to be one of the best TV shows of 2018. Don’t miss it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Brian Tallerico
    It’s hard to believe that Weiner and company couldn’t have hit the same thematic beats and delivered tighter, more engaging drama in the run time of a standard episode of television, but there’s a sense that someone involved here considered length a sign of value. ... In the first two, Melab is particularly subtle and excellent as she steals the superior first film and Bishé reminded me how phenomenal she was on “Halt and Catch Fire” in the second one.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    The virtues of “The Woman Who Fell to Earth” go well beyond Whittaker’s performance and Chibnall’s confident, thoughtful writing of the character. Gill, Cole, and Walsh make excellent additions to the cast, and while each character still wants development (unsurprising, this early on), each also has a moment, or more than one, to shine.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    The voice cast is one of the best on TV, but every episode is stolen by Maya Rudolph, who voices the female version of the Hormone Monster, and makes me laugh every single time. ... We spend way too much time with Coach Steve in season two for my taste--but this is a fearless, clever comedy more often than it’s not.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    There’s a bit of an imbalance in Mr. Inbetween in that it feels like Ryan and Edgerton are way more interested in Ray’s violent world than his domestic one, although that alone makes it unusual as most of these shows focus on "rehabbing" their bad guys more than this one does. The show comes to life most often when Ray finds himself in dangerous situations.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    Netflix’s Maniac is a fascinating, brilliant show, and one of my favorites of 2018. We should expect no less from the creative voices behind “The Leftovers” and “True Detective,” but this show still found a way to surprise me episode after episode. ... Maniac plays with genre and dramatic expectations to gain insight into the human condition in ways that other programs can’t touch.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Brian Tallerico
    This is at the root of the problem with The Good Cop--it could have been called “The Dumb Cop.” Every episode hinges on one of the Tonys, or often both, not seeing something that’s staring them in the face. The supporting cast doesn’t lessen the disappointment.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Brian Tallerico
    The series' quirks don't translate to a rich cleverness, or create the heartbroken laughs that Kidding dreams of. For a show that's full of pain, on-screen talent and so much potential, Kidding is just not very special.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Brian Tallerico
    It’s hard to tell yet if and when this show will emerge from the shadow of its predecessor. Right now, it’s still riding in its wake.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Brian Tallerico
    It feels too much like an afterthought, like subplots deleted from the films. There are times when it works--which is something that could be said about most of the movies too--but it’s hard to imagine people getting excited to tune in week after week.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Brian Tallerico
    Like so much YA fiction, everything here is over-directed and over-written, allowing no room for the teen audience to interpret any deeper meaning. ... And it’s a particular shame that this is so frustrating because the young leads are charming and have solid chemistry. It’s the construction of everything around them--including a flat performance from the typically-solid Pearce--that lets them down.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    The series premiere is the least funny episode, too reliant on setting up its characters and its world. Be patient. Once those are in place, and the writers and talent are allowed to have some fun, it works much better, and it’s the kind of show that gets more enjoyable as it goes along, revealing character through repeated jokes and just having more of a good time.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    Every part is well-performed, but the most-acclaimed veterans--Nighy, Goode, Treadaway--do somewhat steal the show. All three are, as they almost always are, reason enough to watch on their own. And you get a crackling mystery too.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Brian Tallerico
    Too much of Lodge 49 feels almost defiantly undercooked, like it’s trying too hard to capture a laidback SoCal vibe and purposefully avoiding structure and momentum. With so much television out there that even critics can’t keep up with all of it, there’s just not a compelling enough reason to check into Lodge 49.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    These first three episodes--all that were available to press--are masterful displays of the subtle impact of tragedy on behavior, all against the backdrop of an increasingly-heated drug war that we know will eventually help turn Jimmy into Saul.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    Some of the storytelling feels less refined than last year--people often sound like they’re over-explaining everything or verbalizing every question flitting through their minds when more subtlety would make for more effective drama--but the cast is again strong enough that The Sinner could again be an addictive summer distraction right when we need it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    While “Dark Tourist” may not quite be “No Reservations” yet, the best parts of it reflect that curiosity about life outside the bubble, and this is not just a culinary bubble but a safety one.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    America to Me is a momentous achievement. ... The gift of America to Me is that the big picture for all of us is in the relatively little one of this particular school; the macro is in the micro. ... It’s the way that James and his team construct America to Me that’s so remarkable. You can feel both empathy and frustration in the same moment.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Brian Tallerico
    Beautifully constructed by Vallée and Noxon, and unforgettably performed by an ensemble that seems destined for awards ceremony stages in the near future, this is a worthy follower to “The Night Of” and “Big Little Lies” in this new trend of HBO Mini-Series Obsessions.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    [Stephen Frears] does his best work in over a decade. ... He brings the absolute best out of Hugh Grant and Ben Whishaw, who give riveting performances in the telling of one of the U.K.’s most shocking political scandals. This is a must-see.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Brian Tallerico
    A trio of performances that I thought were good enough in season one to warrant Emmy nominations from Alison Brie, Betty Gilpin and Marc Maron are even better in season two. Looking at the season as a whole, it’s easy to pick out a few subplots that don’t work, but they're easy to ignore on a good show that's only gotten better. ... It’s one of TV’s best comedies.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Brian Tallerico
    The first three episodes of Strange Angel often feel a bit too much like a slow burn, waiting to get to the “good stuff.” Having said that, it’s a reasonably engaging slow burn.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    It’s a must-watch for anyone interested in true crime shows as it’s not only a fascinating case on its own but really the template for so much that’s on television and streaming services today.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    It’s off to a more interesting start than several recent HBO shows (I’m looking at you, “Here and Now”) and the pedigree of the cast and crew should keep the production engaging. We’ve always loved to watch the high and mighty fall in fiction, and seeing the Roys collapse under the weight of their own underhanded machinations should make for an unexpected summer diversion.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Brian Tallerico
    The premiere is notably manipulative, playing off the inherent empathy for children in jeopardy and the desire to see dead loved ones. It feels cheap and unearned, and just no fun.

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